Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Stars/Freelancing

Yay! I proofread the first one and keyboarded the second one. Freelancing!




FOLLOWING BOOK RECEIVED ITS FIRST STARRED REVIEW IN THE DECEMBER 1, 2010 ISSUE OF KIRKUS.

THE EDUCATION OF HAILEY KENDRICK
Written by Eileen Cook
(Simon Pulse; ISBN: 9781442413252; January 2011; Spring catalog page 75)

“Ever since her mom was killed by a drunk driver, Hailey—rich, smart, pretty and popular—has specialized in avoiding risk. Tristan, her boyfriend at their upscale boarding school in Vermont, dotes on her. So why does she risk everything she’s worked so hard for on a random impulse? Or is it random? After her dad cancels their long-planned summer together, she’s caught vandalizing a statue of the school mascot. Worse, she’s seen kissing her partner in crime, and he’s not Tristan. When she refuses to divulge his name, not only is Hailey grounded, so are her classmates, and they’re not happy about it. Her punishment includes assisting the janitor, Drew, a townie whose perspective rocks her world. (It doesn’t hurt that he’s also smart and gorgeous.) Hailey may be an A student headed to the Ivy League, but when it comes to taking a chance on life, she’s clueless. She’s also enormously appealing and great company throughout this breezy read. Yes, it’s chick lit, but of the highest quality—like a gourmet truffle. Cook has whipped up a real treat.”



THE FOLLOWING BOOK RECEIVED ITS FIRST STARRED REVIEW IN THE DECEMBER 1, 2010 ISSUE OF KIRKUS.

CAMO GIRL
Written by Kekla Magoon
(Aladdin; ISBN: 9781416978046; January 2011; Spring catalog page 49)

“Ella and Zachary, sixth-grade misfits, cling to each other to get through the taunts, rejection and, sometimes, abuse from their classmates. Ella is the only black student, and her discolored skin tone has some calling her “Camo-Face,” short for camouflage. Zachary, or “Z,” is small for his age and takes refuge in fantasy to cope with abandonment by his father. When a new black student arrives and seems open to Ella, she has hope for a new friendship, especially because, even though he can fit in with the popular group, Bailey reaches out to her. The insecure Z sees this as a threat, and Ella is torn between her loyalty to him and her wish for some normalcy. This elegantly crafted story features strong writing and solid characterizations of both main and secondary characters. Ella and Bailey’s racial identity is one element in a full and richly textured narrative. An out-of-the-ordinary setting—just outside of Las Vegas—and the nuanced picture of young teens and families under stress make this an outstanding follow-up to Magoon’s Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award–winning debut, The Rock and the River (2009).”
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